Tech-Savvy Employees Can Be Dangerous

Most job advertisements these days cite the importance of computer literacy. From Microsoft Office packages to social media management to coding to graphic design, there is always use for technological skills in business. Although every employer wants a tech-savvy team behind them, there are some cyber crime risks to filling your company with these people. While these skills can be used to boost your business, they can also be used to exploit it, taking advantage of weakened internal IT security and launching cyber attacks from inside.

Here’s a horror story for bosses around the world. A former security officer, Yovan Garcia, has been found guilty of bypassing IT security, hacking his former employer’s systems and conducting a number of cyber crime activities. Firstly, Garcia changed his timesheets to show he worked significantly longer than he did, entitling himself to additional overtime pay. His cyber attacks went further than simple financial rewards, however, and he stole records and details when enabled him to set up a competing business. Garcia was found guilty and ordered to pay back $318,611.70 to his former employer, with additional legal costs potentially added in the future.

It is often far easier to launch these kinds of cyber attacks internally. Garcia managed to get hold of login credentials which enabled him to gain access to the systems. He had not been authorised to do so. However, speculation suggests another employee may have handed them over, intentionally or otherwise. People are automatically more likely to trust their colleagues and not suspect them of being an IT security risk. With the company’s guard down, this environment can be rich pickings for black hat hackers who want to use their skills for cyber crime.

Of course, this is a highly pessimistic view of society and the vast majority of people are not going to set out to maliciously exploit their employers through cyber attacks. However, the fact remains that an increasing number of people have, in theory, the capacity to commit cyber crime. Once you know your way around a computer, you can use your skills in any way your moral compass tells you to. So the question you should ask yourself when you’re hiring new tech-savvy employees is: are they white hat hackers or black hat hackers?

The best way to protect your own company is to heighten every aspect of your IT security. If your software is up-to-date and you have strong firewalls, your weak-points are your employees. Firstly, you need to conduct regular training sessions to ensure every one of them understands the importance of constant vigilance when it comes to cyber crime. Secondly, you need to employ people you trust. High staff turnovers leave your vulnerable. When you must hire new employees, references from previous jobs are essential. Don’t let your guard down and be sure to scrupulously uphold your IT security protocol to ensure you too don’t fall victim to an internal cyber attack.

For more support and advice on this topic, contact Ctrl IT and speak to one of our experts.

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IT Security